News 03.05.18

GLOBALLY ACCLAIMED PRODUCTIONS PLACE TRUST IN VICTORIA



VICTORIA’S UNIQUE FILMING LOCATIONS ARE IN THE SPOTLIGHT AS THE NATIONAL TRUST OF VICTORIA PROVIDES THE ULTIMATE BACKDROP FOR PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK.

The gripping six-part re-imagining of the timeless Australian novel and movie of the same title, Picnic At Hanging Rock has finally landed on screens following great anticipation from local and international audiences. This quintessentially Victorian production features an array of iconic locations, with many of them owned and managed by the film-friendly National Trust of Australia (Victoria).

Custodians of some of Australia’s most significant and extraordinary heritage sites, National Trust of Australia (Victoria) offers unrivaled locations for filming in Melbourne and regional Victoria that are rich in history and accessible to production teams from all around the world.

A primary filming location for Picnic at Hanging Rock, Rippon Lea Estate is a large nineteenth-century mansion surrounded by seven hectares of Victorian pleasure gardens. It is listed on the National Heritage Register as one of the finest examples of an original suburban estate in Australia. Recent Spierig Brothers’ feature Winchester and hit drama series Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries are other major productions to shoot at Rippon Lea Estate. Find more about Rippon Lea Estate here.

 

Rippon Lea Estate (Photo by Anthony Basheer)

 

Another outstanding Victorian era mansion with opulent architectural features – Labassa – was built between 1863 and 1890 in the French Renaissance style. Its ornate interior features embossed and gilded wallpapers, a rare illusionist ceiling, stained glass windows and a sweeping staircase, creating a magical atmosphere. Learn more about Labassa here.

 

Labassa (Photo by Anthony Basheer)

 

Built in 1847, Como House and Gardens is an intriguing mix of Australian Regency and classic Italianate architecture. Its elegant dining and reception rooms are still furnished with preserved heirlooms from its former owners, the Armytage family. More information on Como House here. 

 

Como House and Gardens (Photo by Anthony Basheer)

 

“We are so delighted that we have been able to realise the entire production in Victoria. We felt it was important and gives the production a point of difference from the film. The Victorian landscape that Joan Lindsay brought to life so vividly, we wanted to capture that in our rendering of the novel. The support of Film Victoria, National Trust of Australia (Victoria) and Parks Victoria has been second to none.”
Picnic at Hanging Rock’s executive producer,  Jo Porter

While Como House and Garden, Labassa and Rippon Lea Estate are highly sought-after filming locations for international productions, the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) also offers a great number of other properties that can provide the perfect backdrop to almost any historic production.

One example is Mooramong, where Hollywood comes to the homestead at a 1860s country house revamped for an Australian millionaire and his movie star wife. The estate also incorporates the Mackinnon Nature Reserve on the 4,000-acre property and has some accommodation options available.

 

Mooramong

 

The National Trust of Australia (Victoria) acquired stewardship of the Gulf Station in 1976 and restored its buildings and cottage garden. Gulf Station allows filmmakers to step back in time and emerge themselves in a landscape that has been preserved in time. It is one of the most complete surviving complex of farm buildings of vernacular timber construction in Victoria dating from the mid-nineteenth century.

 

Gulf Station

 

Simon Ambrose CEO, National Trust of Australia (Victoria) said: “Being a host to national and international film productions has been extremely rewarding and enabled our properties and landscapes to be used in exciting new and creative ways. We encourage the film community to consider all of our 39 historic locations throughout Victoria all of which hold either architectural, cultural or social significance for Australia. Their use in films and television helps contribute to our ability to maintain and protect them for future generations. We are grateful to Film Victoria for the work they do in advocating for the screen industry and connecting us with this important community.”

For more information on Victoria’s filming locations and production, incentives contact Joe Brinkmann, Manager – Incentives and Investments joe.brinkmann@film.vic.gov.au or visit www.film.vic.gov.au